(O)ther (P)eople’s (P)osts, 8.26.16

(NOTE: Since O.P.P. took an unexpected hiatus for the last three weeks or so, some of the following links might be old. Unfortunately, we had to cut a lot of links, but significant news (in case you missed it) includes: A Tribe Called Quest reportedly recorded an album before Phife’s death, and Big Boi and Killer Mike have been working on an EP together. Also, for the record, Fuck The NY Post.)

Stealing The American Dream: The True Story of Brooklyn’s Lo Lifes Crew.
“There were so many of us, we would just rush the stores and take all that we could carry.” Excerpt from the Bury Me With The Lo On book. By Thirstin Howl III with Tom Gould
[Cuepoint]

Top Gear: The Oral History of Hip-Hop’s Love Affair With Tommy Hilfiger.
With co-signs from Grand Puba (“I was like a blessing in disguise for that clothing line”), Snoop Dogg, and Aaliyah, Tommy Hilfiger catapulted to success—until a vicious rumor helped dismantle his hip-hop empire. By Karizza Sanchez
[Complex]

De La Soul’s Legacy Is Trapped in Digital Limbo.
“We’re in the Library of Congress, but we’re not on iTunes,” Mr. Mercer said. By Finn Cohen
[New York Times]

Quincy Jones: The day Michael Jackson’s pet snake got loose in the studio
Article also includes this crazy quote: “All I saw were dead bodies, tommy guns and stogies, and piles of money in back rooms. I had my hand nailed to a fence with a switchblade when I was seven. When you’re a kid, you want to be what you see, and I wanted to be a gangster till I was 11.” By Stephen Smith
[The Guardian]

Retrospect For Life: Remembering Common’s Golden Era.
A look back at when Common wasn’t just an ex-Gap model and gun-toting goon from Suicide Squad. By Zilla
[Passion of the Weiss]

20 Years, 20 Questions: Big Boi Reconnects With OutKast’s ATLiens.
Daddy Fat Sax reminisces about the making of his and André 3000’s breakout sophomore album, and hints at upcoming solo work. By Corbin Reiff
[Spin]

Chuck D: ‘Black Lives Matter is a defensive movement’
The Public Enemy leader says: “If we don’t treat all lives equally, then no lives matter.” By David Ma
[The Guardian]

White Rappers, Clear of a Black Planet.
“White rappers — especially in the wake of the success of Macklemore & Ryan Lewis and, to a lesser degree, Iggy Azalea — are now finding paths to success that have little if anything to do with black acceptance…. we have arrived in the post-accountability era of white rap, when white artists are flourishing almost wholly outside the established hip-hop industry, evading black gatekeepers and going directly to overwhelmingly white consumers, resulting in what can feel like a parallel world, aware of hip-hop’s center but studiously avoiding it.” By Jon Caramanica
[New York Times]

Black America & The Police: A Bloody History.
How police departments evolved from slave patrols and a look at possible solutions to correcting racist authority. By David Banner
[Uptown]

The Cipher: David Banner.
From Crooked Lettaz to The God Box. Interview by Shawn Setaro
[The Cipher]

EPMD On Drake Sampling “You’re A Customer” & New Rap Making Kids Dumb.
PMD: “It’s a sign of respect, and also it’s a sign that at the end of the day, everybody wants to be associated to real authentic Hip Hop. To us, that’s a compliment and reassuring that we made our mark.” By Dana Scott
[HipHopDX]

The Making of Casual’s Fear Itself.
Casual and Domino talk about the making of their prolific album, track by track. “To me it was just raw artistry,” says Casual. By David Ma
[Passion of the Weiss]

#SleptOnSoul: Ladybug Mecca – Trip The Light Fantastic (2005).
“My parents allowed me a lot of freedom when I was a child — freedom of movement, freedom of expression — and that has always spilled over into my work.”
By Michael A. Gonzales
[soulhead]

West Coast Hip Hop’s Underground Queen Medusa Still Reigns.
“I’ve been told I’m a millionaire waiting to happen. And there are so many different ways that I would like to give in the community and causes. My millions are coming and I’m here to agitate the maker.” By Ural Garrett
[HipHopDX]

25 Years Later, Cypress Hill’s Debut Album Remains an Ahead-of-Its-Time Classic.
“This was the other L.A. — smoked out but still dangerous. Attacks on crooked pigs, Spanish raps, and sampledelic instrumental tracks still ahead of their time, a quarter century later.” By Jeff Weiss
[LA Weekly]

An Oral History Of Latin Americans In Hip-Hop.
Featuring Charlie Chase, Tony Touch, Fat Joe, Homeboy Sandman, Kemo The Blaxican (Deliniquent Habits), Q-Uniqe, Joell Ortiz, Bodega Bamz. By Phillip Mlynar
[TrackRecord]

Why Lost G-Funk Classic Uncle Sam’s Curse Is More Relevant Than Ever.
“We were empowering ourselves,” collaborator Kokane says about working on Above The Law’s third album (which reportedly is out of print). “We were always talking about [how] the only way we’d be able to get back is if we had the type of organization to mobilize ourselves. But we were doing it with music, with a Nat Turner lick and a Marcus Garvey flow.” By Pete Tosiello
[LA Weekly]

“Summoned By Aliens”: How Beastie Boys, Pete Rock, Q-Tip & Others Changed Rap Music With The Pause-Tape.
Ad-Rock: “It’s some caveman shit, that’s what we used to work with. Banging stones together to make a fire.” By Gino Sorcinelli
[Medium]

Unearthing Biggie’s Lost Recordings.
Interview with Chopped Herring Records boss Bob Lipitch about the Junior M.A.F.I.A demos featuring Biggie and produced by Daddy-O that were recently released. By Mike “DJ” Pizzo
[Cuepoint]

Root For The Villain: Rap, Bullsh*t & A Celebration of Failure… Behind “The One’s & Two’s” with Rapper, Producer, The Du-Rites Drummer & Jack of All Trades, J-Zone.
By Matt Horowitz
[The Witzard]

Contact High: Eddie Otchere, Jamil GS & Joe Conzo Discuss Photographing Black Star, Jay-Z & Cold Crush Brothers.
By Vikki Tobak
[Mass Appeal Link 1, Link 2, Link 3]

Counter Intelligence: Atlanta.
ATL record shops. Photos by Maxwell Schiano
[Red Bull Music Academy]

Originally from egotripland.com: (O)ther (P)eople’s (P)osts, 8.26.16

(O)ther (P)eople’s (P)osts, 4.15.16

Vintage Photos Recall the Early Days of Hip-Hop, Before It Became a Billion-Dollar Industry.
A partial look at the collection of more than 400 images from the 1980s to the early 2000s (including the Danny Clinch photo of Nas that appeared on the cover of ego trip Magazine issue #1) at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. Article includes quotes from Bill Adler. By Katie Nodjimbadem
[Smithsonian]

Meet Pam The Funkstress, Prince’s New DJ.
The Coup’s turntable specialist needs no introduction to longtime hip-hop fans. By Stacey Anderson
[Pitchfork]

Boots Riley Still Loves Oakland.
The Coup’s leader talks gentrification and also shines light on local acts, the best food spots in town, and his memories of a mid-’90s warehouse show with OutKast and Eazy-E. By Joseph Bien-Kahn
[Vice]

The Insomniac’s Guide To Atlanta With Outkast’s Big Boi.
From strip club adventures co-signed by Dave Chappelle, to late-night breakfast institutions. By Ryan Joseph
[First We Feast]

Afrika Bambaataa Calls Sexual Abuse Claims “Baseless and Cowardly.”
“These allegations are baseless and are a cowardly attempt to tarnish my reputation and legacy in hip-hop at this time.” By Daniel Kreps
[Rolling Stone]

A Freak Is a Freak, and Egyptian Lover Is an Icon.
“They kind of called it the ‘West Coast sound,’ but I never saw it as the West Coast sound. I only saw it as the Egyptian Lover sound that I created from mixing Prince and Kraftwerk together to come up with this freaky, big-beat sound.” By Max Bell
[Noisey]

KRS-One: “The Ruling Class Of White People Are Psychopaths.”
A “group of criminals is what governs the United States.” By Soren Baker
[HipHopDX]

PROOFREADING: DeShaun “Proof” Holton, October 2, 1973 — April 11, 2006.
“I could write 100 pages about Proof. Could pronably write a book on him. I could write some shit about black on black crime that would make Deray from Black Lives Matter proud. I could do a super hip-hop story about Proof’s place in Detroit hip-hop that would bring a tear to Harry Allen’s eye. Its impossible to try to sum up Proof ‘s life in one article, so I’m not even gonna try. Ya’ll know how I do it. I’m gonna tell a few stories about him, and I hope ya’ll get some insight into who he was.” By ironsidehex
[RIK]

DJ House Shoes Shares The History Of J-Dilla’s “The Introduction.”
“I began working on music under him. So to have me produce a joint for him where he’s fuckin mimickin one of Tip’s most well known verses for the intro to the shit is fuckin crazy.” By Jerry Barrow
[WatchLOUD]

How An L.A. Engineer Brought The Sound Of J Dilla’s The Diary To Life.
“Jay trusted me to do my thing, so I felt like I had his blessing.”—Dave Cooley. By Laurent Fintoni
[Fader]

Behind The Beat: Statik Selektah.
“It’s become a responsibility [for] us to make sure the kids know what’s going on and know the right way to DJ.” By Danny Schwartz
[hnhh]

Domo Genesis Explains Why Getting Lost for Two Years Helped His Career and Inspired New Album.
“People always get to the point where it’s ‘I’m lost,’ but bro that’s the most perfect time. You’re going to find yourself in being lost.” By Emmanuel C.M.
[XXL]

The Ten Most Popular Rap Tapes To Be Buried With.
“When I die make sure you bury me with a cassette of Paid In Full” goes the song. But what tapes would you want to spend the afterlife with? By Robbie Ettelson
[Unkut]

“It Could Have Been Worse”: An Interview with White Gzus.
The Chicago duo on incarceration, originality in rap music, and lawyers in prison. By Jimmy Ness
[Passion of the Weiss]

Taxi Driver Oral History: De Niro, Scorsese, Foster, Schrader Spill All on 40th Anniversary.
Trivia: Harvey  Keitel’s pimp was originally written as black; producers “had to hire a gang to protect us from other gangs.” By Gregg Kilday
[Hollywood Reporter]

Originally from egotripland.com: (O)ther (P)eople’s (P)osts, 4.15.16

(O)ther (P)eople’s (P)osts, 3.25.16

DJ Jazzy Jeff, a humble champion of hip-hop.
“Music is the most loving and most confusing thing in my life. It keeps me up at night. If I hear a great song, I sing it all in my sleep. If I hear a great album I’ll live with it for four or five months and play it every day, learn it inside out, the chord structures, the arrangements. My brain is a mess of music.” By Jeff Vrabel
[Indy Star]

The Enduring Mystery Of ‘Jawn’, Philadelphia’s All-Purpose Noun.
It’s unlike any word, in any language. By Dan Nosowitz
[Atlas Obscura]

How Quik Is The Name Became an Instant West Coast Classic.
“The phones immediately lit up and they were calling me to do radio interviews,” Quik remembers. “I was just sitting at home with my Compton homeboys and my SP-1200.” By Jeff Weiss
[LA Weekly]

Rapper Nas Invests in Tech With QueensBridge Enterprise.
“I’ve always wanted to be surrounded by the smartest people in the word, and didn’t want to limit that to just music. I meet the people that are changing the games across all different industries, and I get to be there first at the ground level. It’s helped me to progress tremendously in my business.” By Alex Titus
[NBC]

National Endowment for the Humanities grant will preserve Afrika Bambaataa archive.
Bambaataa’s archive comprises hundreds of boxes, including 450 containers with 20,000 vinyl records, many of them annotated by Bambaataa and numbered in the order he acquired them. By Melanie Lefkowitz
[Cornell Chronicle]

Interview: Sleepy Brown Talks Organized Noize Documentary, Family Fall Outs and Walking Away From $20 Million / How Organized Noize Put Southern Hip-Hop on the Map.
Atlanta production team behind OutKast and Goodie Mob are in the spotlight with release of Netflix documentary. By Will Lavin & Elias Leight
[Complex & Rolling Stone]

Unbreakable: Mr. Lif On A Career Resurrected.
Lif speaks on the tour bus crash that nearly ended his life, signing with Mello Music Group and how Thievery Corporation may have saved his career. By Jake Rohn
[HipHopDX]

Liner Notes: The Indescribable, Unlikely Magic of The Score, and The Fugees.
How do you go from being second-tier tax write-offs to releasing a monster album in just two years? By Jeff Weiss
[Vinyl Me, Please]

No Malice Finds Himself in The End of Malice Documentary, Returns to Rap With Let the Dead Bury the Dead Album.
“Our music was 100 percent non-fiction but there was more to it and I just feel like I had to shed light on the downside. Not everything was so glamorous.” By Sidney Madden
[XXL]

Legalize It All: How to win the war on drugs.
Watergate co-conspirator explains what kicked off the drug prohibition: “The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.” By Dan Baum
[Harpers]

Lee “Scratch” Perry at 80: “I am a prince and the music is the king.”
“If you have good music you have good magic:” The pioneer of dub reminisces about Bob Marley, Haile Selassie and laying off weed (temporarily). By Dave Simpson
[The Guardian]

How Light In The Attic Became One Of The Most Successful Re-Issue Labels In the World.
Interview with Matt Sullivan, who helps introduce people to great, under-appreciated music. By Will Schube
[Forbes]

Invisible Hits: Iggy Pop’s Decade of Destruction.
Back in the ‘70s nobody would have predicted that he would outlive legends David Bowie and Lou Reed. By Tyler Wilcox
[Pitchfork]

Photographing Hardcore: Ed Arnaud.
His raw photos captured some of the most important bands of the era. By Chris Black
[Green Room Radio]

This site lets you dig through your favorite vinyl from the golden era of hip-hop.
“The experimental crate digging experience:” Digging Into Hip Hop (dihh) is a hip-hop-themed 3D interactive website that simulates the experience of digging for underground hits and ’90s classics in a vinyl store. By Dimitar Mihov
[TNW]

No Country For Old (Rap) Men: The Art Of The Patched Rap Album.
With Kanye still finalizing The Life of Pablo, will digitally reworking albums after their release be a trend in the future? By Robbie Ettelson
[Unkut]

Originally from egotripland.com: (O)ther (P)eople’s (P)osts, 3.25.16